Compiled by:   Mark Trout,

Webmaster and President of the 

Ocala Coin Club

And a collector of type coins, Jefferson nickels, small dollars, Souvenir cards, interesting currencies, F.U.N. tokens, wooden nickels, and a hodgepodge of most other numismatic collectibles!

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​This Treasury Note design was engraved in the 1860s by Joseph Prosper Ourdan (1828-1881) during the early years of the Bureau of Printing and Engraving (BEP). The engraving is based upon the original painting and most famous work of Robert W. Weir (1803-1889). The painting now hangs in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. This $2 note was never issued. The card was released at the 1981 IPPDS&E Convention with their union logo in the bottom right corner and a spider press and pressman embossed on the bottom left.

The second card to highlight the “Landing of the Pilgrims” commemorates the International Paper Money Show (IPMS) held June 20-22, 1986, in Memphis, Tennessee. This card (B-93) features an engraving of the 1854 painting by Peter Frederick Rothermel (1812-1895) centered on the reverse of the “date back” design of the Series 1902 $5 National Bank Note.

The scene depicts several families stepping from the Mayflower’s long boat as they disembark from that craft onto the shores of the New World for the first time. Several Pilgrims in the background kneel in prayer as men with poles and ropes hold the longboat to the rocks. Contained on the card is the quotation: “The Pilgrims represent the hope for a new future, free from prejudice, and the determination to succeed in a new way of life.”

Celebrating Pilgrims on Cards  by Mark Trout


This year marks the quadricentennial (400th anniversary) of the landing of the Pilgrims. There are four nations celebrating this distinguished event: the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the Wampanoag Nation, encompassing the federally recognized tribes of Aquinnah and Mashpee tribes. The purpose of this four-nation celebration is to enhance the understanding of people, places and motivations that culminated in America’s founding story. While the Pilgrims’ story has been placed on U.S. coins, currency, stamps, and various tokens, SCCS members can celebrate the event as it is carried on several souvenir cards, also!

The first appearance of the Pilgrims on a souvenir card is on a forerunner card, F-1981B (Figure 1), produced for the 79th Convention of the International Plate Printers Die Stamps and Engravers Union of North America (IPPDS&E) held in Washington, D.C., May 17, 1981. This bronze-tone card depicts the Embarkation of the Pilgrims.

This Treasury Note design was engraved in the 1860s by Joseph Prosper Ourdan (1828-1881) during the early years of the Bureau of Printing and Engraving (BEP). The engraving is based upon the original painting and most famous work of Robert W. Weir (1803-1889). The painting now hangs in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. This $2 note was never issued. The card was released at the 1981 IPPDS&E Convention with their union logo in the bottom right corner and a spider press and pressman embossed on the bottom left.

​The vignette was originally engraved by Charles Burt some time before 1867 for the $1 National Bank Note. National Currency was introduced during the Civil War to relieve the financial stress following passage of the National Legal Currency Act of February 25, 1863 and a second act passed in 1864.

The third Pilgrim souvenir card was issued at the Dallas (TX) Coin and Stamp Exposition, Dec. 11-14, 1986. It features the reverse of the 1918 $10,000 Federal Reserve Note, the largest denomination to ever circulate among the general public (banks dealt in higher denominations). These high dollar notes actually circulated very little. Although issued by Federal Reserve Banks in Boston, New York, Cleveland, Richmond, and San Francisco, a mere seven pieces are known today, and all are in museums. This card, B-100, shows a vignette of “The Embarkation of the Pilgrims” similar to F-1981B but originally engraved by W.W. Rice in the 1860s. It first appeared on the back of the first charter $50 National Bank Note. Also on the card is a block of four 1920 five-cent stamps commemorating the 300th Anniversary of the landing, with a miniature depiction of the Signing of the Mayflower Compact. 

Two more cards feature Pilgrims, both philatelic. These commemorate the 1920 tercentenary and display three U.S. postage stamps. PS-3, issued September 1970 at Philympia, features enlargements of the one-cent “Mayflower” stamp, the two-cent “Landing of the Pilgrims,” and the five-cent “Signing of the Mayflower Compact.” The Mayflower Compact stands as the first governing document in the Western Hemisphere produced by Europeans. The Pilgrim’s Plymouth colony was the second English settlement in the New World. (Jamestown, Virginia, was the first, established in 1607.) The second philatelic card is ASDA-10 from Interpex in March 1975, featuring the same three Pilgrim stamps, but not intaglio printed.

The next souvenir card is B-158, from the IPMS of June 1992, featuring a dual vignette of Christopher Columbus on the left and “The Landing of the Pilgrims” on the right. These appeared on the reverse of the 1915 $5 Federal Reserve Bank Note. This version of the Pilgrim scene was partially reengraved by G.F.C. Smillie to show a more accurate representation of the Mayflower in the background. 

​FUN Show 2021

Theme for the 66th FUN show: 
"GET YOUR KICKS AT F.U.N. 66
Show Hours:

Thurs. January 7           Fri. January 8 Sat.           January 9 Sun.           January 10
10 AM - 6:30 PM          10 AM - 6:30 PM             10 AM - 5:30 PM        10 AM - 3:00 PM

The show in January is renowned for being the bellwether event on the numismatic calendar. With over 1500 dealers, Heritage Auctions, exhibitors and over 10,000+ of the most avid collectors, the FUN show kicks off the year on a high note. Make your plans early to attend this monumental numismatic event!

Check out the other tabs for further information about our FUN Convention.

Admission to the show is FREE to the public! Show attendees must first stop by the public registration booths and pick up their “HELLO” badge before entering the bourse floor.   Go to:
www.funtopics.com

​​Welcome to the Official Site of The Ocala Coin Club!

​The 300th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ arrival was celebrated in the town of Plymouth from June to September 1921. The extravagant festivities included a parade of 1,200 men and women in colonial costumes. With 100,000 attending, the $200,000 pageant created the worst traffic jam in the history of southeast Massachusetts. Speakers for the event included President Warren G. Harding, Vice-President Calvin Coolidge, Massachusetts Governor Channing Cox, and Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, who orchestrated the entire celebration.

The last issue of the Souvenir Card Journal (Vol. 40, #2) shows the most recent BEP card (B-336) on page 4.  So rare is this card that no photos exist on the internet of the card issued at the Winter F.U.N. show of January 2020.  The 2020 Mayflower Card honors the 400th Anniversary of the Pilgrim’s Landing with a reprint of the Series 1902 $5 National Bank Note “plain back.” The reverse of this note is identical to the one shown earlier on B-93, minus the dates “1902-1908.”

Beginning in October, a 400th Anniversary Celebration is planned for both Plymouth and Provincetown, Massachusetts, if COVID-19 guidelines allow. The celebration, which runs through 2021, will include a candle lighting ceremony and concert, and exhibit of Wampanoag history, and a Forefathers Family Fun Day.

The Pilgrims were religious dissidents who left England for freedom to worship, to prosper and govern themselves under the authority of scripture, not the state church. They left England Sept. 6, 1620, and arrived Dec. 20, naming their new colony to honor their sponsors from Plymouth, England, who financed the journey. The 104 who arrived on that bleak shore and the 53 who survived that first winter, today have an estimated 35 million ancestors, worldwide. Some of their descendants might even collect souvenir cards!
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